WHY IS ANYTHING FORBIDDEN: A TRIBUTE TO NO LIMIT RECORDS various artists cd
WHY IS ANYTHING FORBIDDEN: A TRIBUTE TO NO LIMIT RECORDS various artists cd

WHY IS ANYTHING FORBIDDEN: A TRIBUTE TO NO LIMIT RECORDS various artists cd

Regular price
$15.00
Sale price
$15.00

DBA009

INCREDIBLY RARE EARLY RELEASE FROM DEATHBOMB ARC BACK IN THE EARLY 00s. ONLY 4 IN STOCK!!! THESE ARE NEW COPIES, BUT DUE TO AGE MAY HAVE SOME SCUFF MARKS.

LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER!!!

 

"Brian Miller's work in Rose for Bodhan has been as much hip-hop as anything else in ways, and a similar aesthetic has been at work with many of the bands signed to his Deathbomb Arc label. That's what makes Why Is Anything Forbidden? -- and rarely has a title been so on-the-money in terms of intent and results -- such a fun collection, at once a label sampler and a tribute to a specific sound. This certainly isn't a Master P extravaganza as such, though the acknowledgements to his work and that of his stable are both lyrical (consider Slowcoach's "Old Dirty Bastard Fuck Fuck Master P" or the Meths' "Master P's Theater") and sonic. Books on Tape, in particular, comes up with a winner all the way around with "Who Ya Truckin' Wit?," with Chaki and Kerri Karrang dropping some further vocal action celebrating the Dirty South even as the rhythms shift from New Orleans to the planet Tharg. The Nether-Carols' "Dick in My Car (Still Couldn't Fuck With My Sound)" is at once bizarro quirk bleeps and beats and drawling nerd braggadacio, while Wio's "Now, on Your Knees!" is even better, a blend of glitch beats, chopped-up acoustic guitar, and alternately rapped and sung vocals that transform lyrical bluntness into a delicate, melancholic beauty. Then there's the more oblique salutations -- Das Moustacheprojekt's "Keine Begrenzung" uses telling samples interspersed amid a collision of squelching bass and breaks with dreamy and stuttering IDM/post-rock drones. The ever-on-the-ball Celesteville comes up with a real winner in "R (Hot Carl)" -- it's more funky indie rock than hip-hop, true, but the skill of the line, "And the office space is eternally grim/And your eyes will glaze to the soft rock din" cannot be denied -- while Rose For Bodhan itself indulges in a fun bit of bass-heavy slink and bounce with the brief "Pho Remix" of "Then She Flew Across the World." - All Music Guide